Sokoke Forest Cat

Hello, my dear readers. I wasn’t there for a few days because I had a lot of translation work, but I’ve come back and I want to show you the new pattern in our shop – Sokoke Forest Cat. This exotic cat originates from the Sokoke district of eastern Kenya but was further developed in Denmark. Despite its wild character, Sokoke Cat is friendly by nature and can be perfect for those seeking an animal companion. It has a relatively small head with almond-shaped eyes that are usually amber to light green in color. But the most eye-catching feature of the Sokoke Cat, however, is its unusual coat, which is lustrous, short, and body-hugging. The coat pattern, dubbed “African Tabby,” resembles the Blotched Tabby with a “wood grain” look. The color of the coat ranges from warm light brown to deep chestnut brown. So if you are a Cat person, you can stitch this beauty and have it for yourself forever!

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Finished Cloudberry Picture

I’ve done it! Complete cross-stitching and framed in a hoop.

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Now I can say, that it was an adventure and a challenge for me. Cross stitching wasn’t a big problem, I know the author of the pattern and I was aware of the fact, that Serafima Abramova uses a lot of blends in her projects. That’s ok, but I haven’t back stitched with two threads before. One thread is ok, but two? What is more, it was a light green thread. So when I started back-stitching, I noticed, that it doesn’t look nice for me. And since I’m a perfectionist, I couldn’t leave it like this. After consulting with the author of the pattern and my cross-stitching colleagues from a Facebook group, I tried some different methods and decided to do this backstitch with couching. I did it for the first time and I understood, that I need either stands or the third hand to do it correctly. Can you imagine, what it looked like? But because I’m still very stubborn, I made it.  Everything else was simple. Although I was afraid that the red color might stain the fabric during washing, I almost completely dried out the picture and only then I ironed it carefully and it turned out that ironing the natural linen is much harder than evenweave. I was also a little afraid of sewing white felt to the back of the picture, but everything went well and in the end, I’m satisfied with the result of my work. I hope that the customer will also be satisfied with this cross-stitched picture.